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Galway and the Cliffs of Moher

Day 5

On the third day in Ireland, Catherine and I booked a trip West. We headed first to Galway, a large-by-Irish-standards city. From there we headed to a family farm in nearby Clare. It was WONDERFUL, and the weather we had couldn't be beat. We walked up their mountain, and got some amazing views:

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After our hike, we went into the grandmother's house, which had been converted into a sort of a cafe. We noshed on homemade baked-goods and sipped tea. I chose the award-winning carrot cake over the apple pie, chocolate cake and tiramisu cake (I'd had quite enough of Italian food), and BOY OH BOY I was happy!

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From there we took a scenic drive towards the cliffs, and I snapped some shots of the beautiful countryside - Dublin was a bit boring, but Ireland is fantastic. They say there are more types of green here than anywhere else, and I absolutely believe them:

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The cliffs were our final destination. For those of you who don't know,

"The Cliffs of Moher (Irish: Aillte an Mhothair, lit. cliffs of the ruin, also known as the Cliffs of Mohair) are located in the parish of Liscannor at the south-western edge of the Burren area near Doolin, which is located in County Clare, Ireland. The cliffs rise 120 meters (390 ft) above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head (Irish: Ceann na Cailleach), and reach their maximum height of 214 meters (702 ft) just north of O'Brien's Tower, eight kilometres away. The views from the cliffs attract close to one million visitors per year. On a clear day, the Aran Islands are visible in Galway Bay, as are the valleys and hills of Connemara. O'Brien's Tower is a round stone tower at the approximate midpoint of the cliffs. It was built by Sir Cornelius O'Brien, a descendant of Ireland's High King Brian Boru, in order to impress female visitors.[1] From atop that watchtower, visitors can view the Aran Islands and Galway Bay, the Maum Turk Mountains and the Twelve Pins to the north in Connemara, and Loop Head to the south."

They are spectacular. Awe-inspiring. Dangerous.

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After the cliffs, we grabbed a late lunch. I am not kidding you when I say that Ireland will serve you bacon as a main meal. Its fantastic. Naomi, get yerr bum over herr!

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On the way back, we stopped at another beautiful cliff-beach thing, and took a few more photos.

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It was right next to a farm that had alpaca and sheep!

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The long and winding road returned us to Galway, before we headed back to Dublin.

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Posted by Traveling Spoon 07:37

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